Indexikalia - Beispiel von Kaplan

    This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

    • Perrys HInweis auf "an advocate of the doctrine of propositions" (S. 7) lässt die Frage aufkommen, wer damit angesprochen ist.
      "You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time" (Abraham Lincoln). — "Der Mensch ist gut! Da gibt es nichts zu lachen! [...] Der Mensch ist gut. Da kann man gar nichts machen. Er hat das, wie man hört, vom lieben Gott" (Erich Kästner).
    • Ich vermeide ja eher das Reden von ‚Tiefe‘. Aber die Tiefe von Kaplans „Demonstratives“ ist mir damals nicht annähernd so deutlich gewesen wie heute.


      (6) I am here now.

      (7) David Kaplan is in Portland on 26 March 1977.

      (7) is empirical, and so is (6).
      But here we have missed something essential to our understanding of indexicals. Intuitively, (6) is deeply, and in some sense, which we will shortly make precise, universally true. One need only understand the meaning of (6) to know that it cannot be uttered falsely. No such guarantees apply to (7). A Logic of Indexicals which does not reflect this intuitive difference between (6) and (7) has bypassed something essential to the logic of indexicals.

      (8)  Necessarily-Operator* I am here now.

      But (8) should not be logically true, since it is false. It is certainly not necessary that I be here now.





      * im Originaltext der übliche Kasten
      Metaphern stinken
    • kunnukun wrote:

      Ich vermeide ja eher das Reden von ‚Tiefe‘. Aber die Tiefe von Kaplans „Demonstratives“ ist mir damals nicht annähernd so deutlich gewesen wie heute.


      (6) I am here now.

      (7) David Kaplan is in Portland on 26 March 1977.

      (7) is empirical, and so is (6).
      But here we have missed something essential to our understanding of indexicals. Intuitively, (6) is deeply, and in some sense, which we will shortly make precise, universally true. One need only understand the meaning of (6) to know that it cannot be uttered falsely. No such guarantees apply to (7). A Logic of Indexicals which does not reflect this intuitive difference between (6) and (7) has bypassed something essential to the logic of indexicals.

      (8)  Necessarily-Operator* I am here now.

      But (8) should not be logically true, since it is false. It is certainly not necessary that I be here now.



      * im Originaltext der übliche Kasten
      S. Marc Cohen erläutert Indexicals so: "when a speaker uses 'I' she refers to herself", "when a speaker uses 'today' he refers to the day on which his utterance-token is produced". Entsprechendes gilt für "here" und "now". Und das sei bei Indexicals so wegen "linguistic rules which govern their use" (Kaplan on Demonstrativs, 2008, PDF-S. 1).

      Falls es sich so verhält, wie Cohen erläutert, ist "I am here now" eine analytische Wahrheit, die sich aus 'I' begrifflich ergibt, denn jedes I hat als indexikalisches Zentrum ("speaker") notwendig einen Ort in der Zeit, auf den mit "here" und "now" referiert wird.

      In dem Aufsatz von David Kaplan zu Demonstrativs von 1977 findet sich die von dir zitierte Passage auf S. 508-509 (dieser Aufsatzsammlung).

      (Ich selber würde Indexikalität jedoch nicht mit linguistischen Regeln erläutern, sondern unter Hinweis auf Faktizität, was aus "I am here now" eine synthetische Aussage macht, die nicht notwendig wahr ist, falls sie wahr ist.)
      "You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time" (Abraham Lincoln). — "Der Mensch ist gut! Da gibt es nichts zu lachen! [...] Der Mensch ist gut. Da kann man gar nichts machen. Er hat das, wie man hört, vom lieben Gott" (Erich Kästner).
    • Dieser Text ist voll unglaublich interessanter Beispiele. Und er übersteigt meine Fähigkeiten. Das erste Mal las ich ihn eben damals, aber ich merke, dass ich diesmal alle Unterstreichungen werde wiederholen müssen.
      Als Antwort auf Einwände kam "Afterthoughts"; habe ich heute ausgedruckt (googleauffindbar).
      Ich bin überfordert. Aber klar ist, dass das ganz in den Strom der Erkenntnisse jener Zeit passt, zu denen Putnams "Meaning of Meaning", Kripkes "Mening and Necessity", dann Burges Arthritis, ... gehören und die u.a. Situationssemantik hervorbrachten. Perrys großartiges Beispiel des Supermarktbesuchers, der nicht merkt, dass Er es ist, der eine Zuckerspur mit dem Einkaufswagen hinterlässt. Das begann mit Lewis Attitudes de se, Castanedas Arbeiten, ... - geniale Köpfe. Aber Kaplan ist hart.

      Danke:

      Fliege wrote:

      S. Marc Cohen erläutert Indexicals so: "when a speaker uses 'I' she refers to herself", "when a speaker uses 'today' he refers to the day on which his utterance-token is produced". Entsprechendes gilt für "here" und "now". Und das sei bei Indexicals so wegen "linguistic rules which govern their use" (Kaplan on Demonstrativs, 2008, PDF-S. 1).
      Metaphern stinken
    • kunnukun wrote:

      Dieser Text ist voll unglaublich interessanter Beispiele. Und er übersteigt meine Fähigkeiten. Das erste Mal las ich ihn eben damals, aber ich merke, dass ich diesmal alle Unterstreichungen werde wiederholen müssen.
      Als Antwort auf Einwände kam "Afterthoughts"; habe ich heute ausgedruckt (googleauffindbar).
      Ich bin überfordert. Aber klar ist, dass das ganz in den Strom der Erkenntnisse jener Zeit passt, zu denen Putnams "Meaning of Meaning", Kripkes "Mening and Necessity", dann Burges Arthritis, ... gehören und die u.a. Situationssemantik hervorbrachten. Perrys großartiges Beispiel des Supermarktbesuchers, der nicht merkt, dass Er es ist, der eine Zuckerspur mit dem Einkaufswagen hinterlässt. Das begann mit Lewis Attitudes de se, Castanedas Arbeiten, ... - geniale Köpfe. Aber Kaplan ist hart.

      Danke:

      Fliege wrote:

      S. Marc Cohen erläutert Indexicals so: "when a speaker uses 'I' she refers to herself", "when a speaker uses 'today' he refers to the day on which his utterance-token is produced". Entsprechendes gilt für "here" und "now". Und das sei bei Indexicals so wegen "linguistic rules which govern their use" (Kaplan on Demonstrativs, 2008, PDF-S. 1).
      Ich gehe den Kaplan-Aufsatz noch einmal in Ruhe durch. Am liebsten mache ich so etwas mit Text auf Papier. Also muss er ausgedruckt werden.

      ---

      [Ich habe mir gerade diesen Text hier zerschossen, weil ich, anders als geplant, keinen neuen Beitrag erstellt, sondern irrtümlich bloß einen alten Beitrag bearbeitet habe. Nun ist das wieder rückgängig gemacht – Fliege.]
      "You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time" (Abraham Lincoln). — "Der Mensch ist gut! Da gibt es nichts zu lachen! [...] Der Mensch ist gut. Da kann man gar nichts machen. Er hat das, wie man hört, vom lieben Gott" (Erich Kästner).

      The post was edited 3 times, last by Fliege ().

    • Die Auseinandersetzung mit Kaplan ist genau das, was Linguisten und Semiotikern oft fehlt, wenn sie nicht aus eigenem Antrieb nach den Pflichtseminaren weiterforschen: Ich habe erlebt, wie einige hängen blieben in den Frege'schen (Carnap'schen) Annahmen:
      - Ausdrücke denotieren eine Bedeutung, vermittelt durch einen Sinn.
      - Propositionen werden evaluiert in Umständen.
      - Individuenterme sind 'versteckte' Beschreibungen.

      So kam es z.B., dass sich jemand darüber lustig machte, dass ein Schüler im Bus sagte "Wenn ich … wäre, dann …". Denn es sei ja ausgeschlossen, dass man möglicherweise jemand anders wäre, als man ist. Natürlich ist es ganz normal, so etwas zu sagen, und auch sinnvoll.
      Metaphern stinken
    • New

      kunnukun wrote:

      Die Auseinandersetzung mit Kaplan ist genau das, was Linguisten und Semiotikern oft fehlt, wenn sie nicht aus eigenem Antrieb nach den Pflichtseminaren weiterforschen: Ich habe erlebt, wie einige hängen blieben in den Frege'schen (Carnap'schen) Annahmen:
      - Ausdrücke denotieren eine Bedeutung, vermittelt durch einen Sinn.
      - Propositionen werden evaluiert in Umständen.
      - Individuenterme sind 'versteckte' Beschreibungen.

      So kam es z.B., dass sich jemand darüber lustig machte, dass ein Schüler im Bus sagte "Wenn ich … wäre, dann …". Denn es sei ja ausgeschlossen, dass man möglicherweise jemand anders wäre, als man ist. Natürlich ist es ganz normal, so etwas zu sagen, und auch sinnvoll.
      Auch aus meiner Sicht eignen sich für eine Auseinandersetzung mit Kaplan dessen Beispielsätze (6) und (7) vorzüglich als Einstieg. Sie lauten (Demonstratives, S. 508-509):
      (6) "I am here now."
      (7) "David Kaplan is in Portland on 26 March 1977."

      An diesen beiden Sätzen möchte Kaplan seinen zentralen Punkt machen. So schreibt er (von dir zitiert; meine Unterstreichung): "Intuitively, (6) is deeply, and in some sense, which we will shortly make precise, universally, true. One need only understand the meaning of (6) to know that it cannot be uttered falsely. No such guarantees apply to (7). A Logic of Indexicals which does not reflect this intuitive difference between (6) and (7) has bypassed something essential to the logic of indexicals" (S. 509).

      Die Bedeutungen von (6) und (7) sind demnach (so verstehe ich Kaplan an dieser Stelle) verschieden, weil (7) syntetisch und entweder wahr oder falsch ist ("is empirical"; S. 509), während (6) analytisch und wahr ist ("logically true", "one need only understand the meaning [...] to know that it cannot be uttered falsely"; S. 509).

      Demnach ist die von Kaplan zuvor skizzierte alte Konzeption ("this view"; S. 508) im Hinblick auf Indexicals unzutreffend ("wrong"; S. 508), weshalb Kaplan diese alte Konzeption zu reformieren versucht ("our reform"; S. 509). Somit wäre insbesondere auch die Konsequenz der alten Konzeption unzutreffend, wonach: "(7) is empircal, and so is (6)" (S. 509).

      Nun stellt sich die Frage: Wie verschiebt sich die Bedeutung beim Übergang von (7) zu (6), indem kontext-sensitive Indexicals verwendet werden ("Indexicals have a context-sensitive character"; S. 506)?
      "You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time" (Abraham Lincoln). — "Der Mensch ist gut! Da gibt es nichts zu lachen! [...] Der Mensch ist gut. Da kann man gar nichts machen. Er hat das, wie man hört, vom lieben Gott" (Erich Kästner).
    • New

      Fliege wrote:

      Nun stellt sich die Frage: Wie verschiebt sich die Bedeutung beim Übergang von (7) zu (6), indem kontext-sensitive Indexicals verwendet werden ("Indexicals have a context-sensitive character"; S. 506)?
      Ja, genau die Stelle.
      Er unterscheidet dann "proper" von "improper Indices" (509 f.)
      Proper: those (w, x, p, t) such that in the world w, x is located at p at the time t.
      improper Indices are like impossible worlds.

      Dann war die Diskussion darüber, ob der Agent am Ort der Äußerung sein muss, nicht so abwegig.
      Metaphern stinken